Epoch Lag

By: Barney & Friends
dannyzapalac:

paulczyzyk:

Garry Winogrand, Venice, California. c.1982-83
Philip-Lorca diCorcia: Strangely, I doubt that anybody in a photo program right now thinks of Garry Winogrand as their prime motivation, although the current practice of photography does have a certain relationship to his work, which could now seem outmoded. I think part of what he did, which is today a process in contemporary photography and art, was to break assumptions.
Leo Rubinfien: Well, maybe that’s one reason why people should look at him again now. The work is very free, and it remains fresh. It’s powerful but it refuses to make grand declarations—it’s powerful partly because it refuses to do that. It’s only outmoded if one thinks that art progresses in a linear way, and that this year’s art disqualifies last year’s. But I don’t believe that there is any such progression. That kind of thinking is a fiction of certain criticism and of the art market. If a work of art is alive, it is alive, no matter when it was made. There is something tremendously open-ended about Winogrand’s work. It’s there picture by picture, and in the overall body of work. It’s a quality of Winogrand’s, but it was a quality that artists often sought in the 1960s. Fellini once said: “To make a movie that has an ending is immoral.” It’s immoral. It’s to lie to the audience. Because life has no endings; life is all flux and discontinuity.
Revisiting the Winogrand Archive: Philip Lorca diCorcia in Conversation with Leo Rubinfien - Interesting short discussion on the Aperture blog. 

// A legend’s work never dies

dannyzapalac:

paulczyzyk:

Garry Winogrand, Venice, California. c.1982-83

Philip-Lorca diCorcia: Strangely, I doubt that anybody in a photo program right now thinks of Garry Winogrand as their prime motivation, although the current practice of photography does have a certain relationship to his work, which could now seem outmoded. I think part of what he did, which is today a process in contemporary photography and art, was to break assumptions.

Leo Rubinfien: Well, maybe that’s one reason why people should look at him again now. The work is very free, and it remains fresh. It’s powerful but it refuses to make grand declarations—it’s powerful partly because it refuses to do that. It’s only outmoded if one thinks that art progresses in a linear way, and that this year’s art disqualifies last year’s. But I don’t believe that there is any such progression. That kind of thinking is a fiction of certain criticism and of the art market. If a work of art is alive, it is alive, no matter when it was made. There is something tremendously open-ended about Winogrand’s work. It’s there picture by picture, and in the overall body of work. It’s a quality of Winogrand’s, but it was a quality that artists often sought in the 1960s. Fellini once said: “To make a movie that has an ending is immoral.” It’s immoral. It’s to lie to the audience. Because life has no endings; life is all flux and discontinuity.


Revisiting the Winogrand Archive: Philip Lorca diCorcia in Conversation with Leo Rubinfien - Interesting short discussion on the Aperture blog. 

// A legend’s work never dies

dannyzapalac:

photographsonthebrain:

"Sergio Romagnoli was killed in 1994. He was 37 years old. Despite an official investigation at the time and subsequent enquiries by his family, the circumstances surrounding his murder have never been fully explained and remain a mystery to this day. At the time of his murder, Sergio and his wife were living on Sao Tomè and Príncipe, a small island nation in the Gulf of Guinea off the West Coast of Central Africa. They had ventured there to do voluntary work in an orphanage for visually impaired children during a particularly tragic moment in their lives; following as it did, the recent death of their baby son Luigi, who had died after a serious illness at the age of one."

The result of many years work, the photographs gathered inA Drop In the Ocean date from the ’70s and ’80s and are but a few of the many thousands taken by the Italian Naturalist Sergio Romagnoli during his all too brief lifetime. The primary interest for the curators,Alessandro CalabreseandMilo Montelli, besides their natural human fascination for an incredible story, lay in the opportunity to interact with a rough body of images free of any artistic claim.

A DROP IN THE OCEAN BY ALESSANDRO CALABRESE & MILO MONTELLI

Published by ÉDITIONS DU LIC

/// Add this to the bucket list

Spike…

Picking up chicks.

Picking up chicks.

Throwin’ back turkey legs.

Throwin’ back turkey legs.